Schoolteacher Nooses are Racist

Even when the teachers are threatening to lynch… themselves? As a back-to-school prank? The rabbit trail leads us to the true racial history of California.

Linda Brandts is a California elementary school principal suspended after sharing a photo of her teachers holding a noose in a mass email, Fox 11 reports.

Brandts, the principal of Summerwind Elementary School, and the four teachers pictured in the photo, were suspended, the school district said in a statement.

Linda Brandts

Whoa, Nelly. That’s not a picture I would pose for, let alone for mass distribution. And the principal was reportedly suspended for getting a chuckle out of this. What’s going on?

We have a manjaw/NYC haircut feminist on the far left. But the teacher to the right looks normal, the next is so old that her wrinkles could mean anything and the rightmost is a serial killer of only donuts. This ain’t the KKK.

Fox 11 reported that Brandts was under consideration to become the district’s next superintendent.

Okay, that’s a motive for… what’s the crime? Besides bad taste?

“This afternoon it has been brought to the Palmdale School District’s attention that an incident involving the discovery of a noose and possibly inappropriate responses to that discovery occurred at Summerwind Elementary School,” Palmdale School District Superintendent Raul Maldonado told Fox 11. “The Principal has been placed on administrative leave pending an investigation of the matter.”

So far, sounds more like a witch hunt than a lynching. But there’s still that noose. Interesting.

Brandts, the Summerwind Elementary School’s principal, sent the photo of the four teachers holding up a noose and a separate photo of the noose handing in an office to her entire staff, Fox 11 reported.

There was nothing written in the email.

Ah, so Brandts isn’t one of the teachers pictured.

The photo sent by Brandt was reshared on social media where it was discovered by parents.

Denise Royal, whose three children attend the school, told The AV Times that “it looks like a noose, a noose used to hang my ancestors from trees… black people.”

Even more interesting. The pic was popular enough to be shared by third parties and the first (only?) group to take offense was the blacks.

Parent Darrin Harper said he was furious when he saw the photo and said it was a racist gesture invoking lynchings.

“You hate them little black babies. You hate them little Spanish babies. All them little minorities. You hate em!” he told Fox 11.

This is Darin Harper:

'You hate them little black babies. You hate them little Spanish babies. All them little minorities,' upset Darrin Harper expressed

Looks like an upstanding citizen to me. Perhaps he’s camera-shy.

Breyon Clemmons told the outlet that racism has been a “prevalent” problem at the school and that teachers singled out black and Hispanic kids.

Get real. If three Neo-Nazis are in a room at the same time then two of them are moles.

Teacher Michele Lemaire told the station that black students made up about one-third of the student body and Hispanic students made up another third but the vast majority of teachers at the school are white.

This incident is just minorities (blacks) doing their usual ray-ciss routine. But that still doesn’t explain tweeting a noose. I had to hunt for an explanation… most “professional” journalists couldn’t be bothered to give the most basic of context. New article:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7015489/Principal-teachers-suspended-California-elementary-school-photo-posing-NOOSE.html

While some suspect the photo may be have been a ‘back-to-school necklaces’ – an insider joke among educators that suggests they want to kill themselves just thinking about returning to their job after the school break – the picture has been slammed as insensitive or outright racist by others. …

Parents had become outraged after learning of the collage, which showed a pair of nooses jokingly dubbed ‘back-to-school necklaces’.

The classroom collage also included a pink smiley face sticker, and the words ‘ha ha’ and ‘#yes.’

It was apparently in reference to an insider joke among educators that suggests they want to kill themselves just thinking about returning to their job after the school break.

According to Urban Dictionary, the phrase ‘back to school necklace’ is another name for a noose.

‘This is due to the utter despair you feel when school starts back up again,’ the entry for the term reads.

Our public schools are clearly FUBAR. Forget racial grievances. When even the principal is laughing about lynching herself instead of teaching kids for another year, there’s clearly a crisis-level morale issue.

But like the Godless fool said, never let a crisis go to waste.

Parent Breyon Clemmons said that one of the teachers in the image has been the subject of racial controversy before.

Parent Breyon Clemmons said that one of the teachers in the image has been the subject of racial controversy before. Her daughters were taken out of class

Breyon. An example of “Ocasio-Cortes” face?

Clemmons said her younger daughter is now having issues with a teacher at the school.

I can’t imagine where the kid picked up that attitude.

She told Fox 11: ‘I’ve requested that my kid be taken out of one classroom because that teacher, in particular, has shown prejudice discrimination against my kid and when I requested the black teacher I got grief for that.’

Now I can. You want to see grief? Watch a white parent demand a white teacher.

Clemmons let her fourth-grade daughter skip class Thursday as they held a protest.

Baby’s first protest!

I was surprised to learn there’s still an enclave of blacks in California outside Oakland. A little research on the community’s history gave this. Heavy cut&pasting was done on the coming article.

SUN VILLAGE : Black Enclave Withers Amid Antelope Boom

https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1989-08-27-me-1851-story.html

By Sebastian Rotella, 27 August 1989

The pioneers of Sun Village, a small black community founded 40 years ago in the Antelope Valley, tell of struggle, hope and change. Their stories in some ways evoke the shifting ethnic and racial landscapes of urban America.

The eastern Antelope Valley has become the bustling frontier of a housing and population surge that has turned Palmdale and Lancaster into 1980s’ boom towns.

But the pioneers have watched Sun Village fade amid the growth, the black population shrinking from its peak of 2,000 in the 1960s to 500 today. The shops and bars that once formed a small center of town at 90th Street East and Palmdale Boulevard are boarded up.

As far as the U. S. Postal Service and many others are concerned, Sun Village does not exist. The area is considered a neighborhood in the northern part of unincorporated Littlerock, a longtime agricultural community.

Narcissa Homes has built 500 homes in Sun Village since 1984 and is building about 200 more. But Richard Deebs, a manager at the firm, said he had never heard of Sun Village.

“I think it’s a dying name,” he said.

He called the community Littlerock and described it as an attractive, ethnically mixed area where ranch-style homes on one-acre lots sell for between $120,000 and $160,000, double the price of three years ago.

Google Earth still has the place listed. Littlerock and Sun Village are essentially the same location, consisting of the east side of Palmdale. Palmdale itself had more rattlesnakes than humans until Los Angeles’ urban sprawl finally managed to outgrow the mountain range bordering its north side. I know some folks there and it’s a great place to live, if you’re a millionaire who likes a dry heat and four hours of commuting per workday.

[The] pioneers have watched Sun Village fade amid the growth, the black population shrinking from its peak of 2,000 in the 1960s to 500 today. The shops and bars that once formed a small center of town at 90th Street East and Palmdale Boulevard are boarded up.

Longtime residents discuss the influx of newcomers with emotions ranging from resentment to acceptance. They see signs of hope, and they cherish the institutions that endure–the Chamber of Commerce, a women’s club, churches clustered on the prairie, a park named after another pioneer–baseball star Jackie Robinson.

[Then-County Supervisor Warren Dorn] had grown up with Jackie Robinson in Pasadena, and he agreed with residents that naming the park after the first black baseball player in the major leagues would be fitting. Robinson attended the ceremonies in 1964. A plaque was unveiled that said Robinson would be remembered not only as an athlete but “as the proud crusader against pompous bigots and timid sentinels of the status quo–as the symbol of a new Negro American.”

Black hatred (envy?) of whites has apparently not dimmed from that day 55 years ago to last week’s scandal. That attitude defined this community.

Melvin Ray Grubbs, a black lawyer-turned-real estate agent from Chicago’s South Side, was the community’s principal founder. He came to California in the 1940s and joined forces with a white family named Marble, who owned Sun Village Land Corp. The company owned 1,000 acres occupied mainly by Joshua trees, jack rabbits and snakes.

With Grubbs in charge of sales, the Marbles became perhaps the first landowners in the Antelope Valley to sell to blacks.

“Blacks couldn’t live in Palmdale,” recalled William Shaw, president of the Sun Village Chamber of Commerce and former superintendent of the nearby Wilsona School District, who came to Sun Village in 1957. Palmdale residents “would tell you that directly to your face.”

THAT is INTERESTING. Why, if one’s race is unwelcome in a certain area, would you want to force your way in despite the locals’ wishes? I asked the question about Jews forcing their way into wealthy La Jolla near San Diego and I ask it here, too. At least La Jolla was valuable land whereas Palmdale pre-urban sprawl was not. Blacks might share Jewish ethnic solidarity instincts but apparently not their business instincts.

Whites actively opposed non-whites moving into their communities as recently as the ’50s and ’60s. This has been scrubbed from modern history books.

The racial climate outside the community, like the desert’s harsh physical climate, was less than perfect.

“Some of the older whites and older blacks had the same old Mississippi ideas,” said the Rev. Henry Hearns, 56, a sharecropper’s son from Mississippi who for 24 years has been pastor of First Missionary Baptist Church on 100th Street East. Hearns, also chief environmental engineer at Edwards Air Force Base, designed the church, which was built in 1975.

Sun Village’s transition accelerated in the 1980s. Residents said change has brought occasional pains, such as the tension between young whites, blacks and Latinos that has flared intermittently at Jackie Robinson Park. New and old residents have also reacted differently to the area’s board-and-care homes, whose wandering residents draw complaints from new, young families seeking rural tranquility.

Longtime residents agree that some homes have not been well-run, as shown by a recent state and county crackdown on unlicensed facilities. But some say the homes have been accepted partly because they were one of the few ways to earn a living in Sun Village.

Africa in a nutshell.

During the past several years, Sun Village has been a focus for protests against alleged bias and harassment of blacks in the Antelope Valley.

One case that caused an outcry involved Ava Casey Brown, a Sun Village woman with no previous criminal record who was sentenced in 1987 to five years in prison for forcing her daughter’s car off the road during a car chase, injuring a teen-age passenger. A state appellate court ruled her sentence was too harsh and ordered her release after nine months.

That’s gotta be a good story! Per the LA Times:

You have reached this month’s limit of free articles.

Fuck! Not now! But here’s the blurbs:

Brown, a nurse’s aide and Sunday school teacher, ran her daughter, Renee Casey, off the road in a car chase after Casey stayed out late without permission. Brown pursued Casey at speeds up to 80mph and bumped her car at least twice, causing a crash in which Casey was uninjured but a teen-age passenger in her car suffered a broken collarbone.

A Lancaster judge Thursday sentenced Ava Casey Brown to five years probation, [throwing out the original five-year prison term].

Either Brown got a pussy pass for the attempted murder of her own daughter, or the passenger’s name was Romeo and the judge decided she was Parent of the Year.

Either way, this was not a racism issue.

Sun Village residents also protested the death of a black woman transient armed with a butcher knife who in April was shot 18 times by deputies at a Lancaster fast-food restaurant.

Swift, proportionate justice is always a good reason to riot against Whitey. Thursday is also a good reason to riot against Whitey.

[Pastor] Hearns, who has worked to smooth relations between the Sheriff’s Department and the community over the years, called that shooting “totally unwarranted.”

But he expressed strong support for the Sheriff’s Department and said he does not believe that there is a racial problem in the Antelope Valley.

Hearns’ church, which began with 30 members in the 1950s, has nearly 1,000 members and continues to thrive despite Sun Village’s shrinking black population.

“There is life here; there is energy here,” Hearns said as a gospel group rocked the adjoining chapel.

Hearns’ parishioners come from all over the Antelope Valley, where the black population has increased from 3% to at least 5% since 1980, according to county statistics. Hearns said Sun Village has changed partly because blacks can now live where they choose.

It’s a point I’ve brought up before. Mass migration means nobody gets to live among their own people. What’s happening to all that abandoned land in Honduras right now? It’s hard for me to check because I don’t speak Spanish and they aren’t online like ‘Murica is, but wouldn’t it be something if all those abandoned homes are being bought up cheap by globalist Elites?

One new idea is Mabel’s, a restaurant that will open in November across the street from the desolate ruins of the 90th Street shopping area. Owner Douglas Cross, whose wife is a Lancaster physician, describes Mabel’s as a ” ’50s’ restaurant, serving American food with a touch of soul.”

Cross acknowledges that he is something of a pioneer in a culinary wilderness. But he said he has studied the area’s growth and is confident that the local black community will join residents of all races in making Mabel’s a success.

The Cross family power couple is the new normal. Nobody is winning the forced race-mixing of Current Years. We’re all at risk of losing our history and identity.

 

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